RIP


Yusef Lateef – Love theme from The Robe
Dr. Yusef Lateef (born William Emanuel Huddleston, October 9, 1920 – December 23, 2013) was an American jazz multi-instrumentalist, composer and educator and a renowned spokesman for the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community after his conversion to Islam in 1950. Lateef was born in Chattanooga, Tennessee, but his family moved to Detroit, Michigan in 1925.

What year is this anyway?


Sylk 130 – City 5-6 theme

Sylk 130 is the side project of producer King Britt. King Britt is a pioneer of all things soulful, rhythmically textured and melodically provocative. This Philadelphia native has found a way to escape the strictures of a single category of music by expressing his creations through deep house, hip-hop, broken beat, nu-jazz, funk and afro-tech. Whether it’s film scoring for Hollywood, rocking the playa at Burning Man or consulting for the leading urban lifestyle brands, there are no limits to what King Britt will do next.

A few things that I would like to mention


Johnny Hammond – Tell me what to do

Johnny Hammond was a pseudonym John Robert Smith (b. 16 Dec 1933, Louisville, KY, USA – d. 4 Jun 1997 – aka Johnny “Hammond” Smith), a jazz organist. He was renowned for playing the Hammond B-3 organ, thus earning “Hammond” as a nickname. Smith recorded a series of albums on the well-regarded CTI Records (Creed Taylor) jazz record label. Hammond’s song “Shifting Gears” was featured on the breakbeat compilation “Ultimate Breaks and Beats”.

Willie Dixon and the Four Jumps of Jive


The Big Three Trio – You Sure Look Good To Me

For the legendary Willie Dixon, the Big Three Trio was an important launching pad for a fantastic career. Pianist Leonard “Baby Doo” Caston and guitarist Bernardo Dennis (replaced after a year by Ollie Crawford) joined upright bassist Dixon to form the popular trio in 1946. Caston was just out of the service (where he’d played on U.S.O. tours during World War II); Dixon had been a conscientious objector. Dixon had previously worked with Caston in the Five Breezes and with Dennis in the Four Jumps of Jive.

Cha Cha Cha


Dean Martin – (I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons

Dino Paul Crocetti (born June 7, 1917 in Steubenville, Ohio; died December 25, 1995 in Beverly Hills, California), better known as Dean Martin and often referred to as the King of Cool, was an Italian American singer, actor, comedian and member of The Rat Pack who was signed to Frank Sinatra’s Reprise Records. Despite the fact that Martin couldn’t read music, he recorded more than 100 albums over his career, racking up major hits such as That’s Amore, Volare and his signature tune Everybody Loves Somebody. He was also a successful film actor and won a Golden Globe nomination for his performance in Who Was That Lady?

The frog


Flow Dynamics – Bossa For Bebo (Lack Of Afro Mix)

Australian producer Flow Dynamics has been creating boogie fever and booty havoc on dancefloors across the globe, with his music getting played by many of the world’s top DJs.
João Donato de Oliveira Neto was born on 1934 in Brazil, the son of a military father. Still a teenager, he demonstrated more musical than scholastic ability and so left school in 1949. He lived with fellow musicians, played guitar in the bars of Rio de Janeiro and, of course, talked about music. In the 1950s he visited the Sinatra-Farney Fan Clube, considered by many specialists as the school that created the Bossa Nova.

Kind of blue


Miles Davis – Blue in green
(sampled here)
Kind of Blue is a studio album by American jazz musician Miles Davis, released August 17, 1959, on Columbia Records in the United States. Recording sessions for the album took place at Columbia’s 30th Street Studio in New York City on March 2 and April 22, 1959. The sessions featured Davis’s ensemble sextet, which consisted of pianists Bill Evans and Wynton Kelly, drummer Jimmy Cobb, bassist Paul Chambers, and saxophonists John Coltrane and Julian “Cannonball” Adderley.